Leadership in Absentia

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The decision to lead is not particularly complicated, at least not on the surface.  It’s a simple, often quiet commitment to create the conditions for other people’s success. The NYT had a great illustration of this philosophy in its article on Clarence Otis Jr., the CEO of Darden Restaurants.  In Otis’s words:

…leaders really think about others first. They think about the people who are on the team, trying to help them get the job done. They think about the people who they’re trying to do a job for. Your thoughts are always there first…you think last about “what does this mean for me?”

I was particularly moved by one of his reference points, his predecessor’s response to 9/11:

…we had an all-employee meeting…One of the first things he said was, ‘we are trying to understand where all our people are who are traveling.’ The second thing he said was: ‘We’ve got a lot of Muslim teammates, managers in our restaurants, employees in our restaurants, who are going to be under a lot of stress during this period. And so we need to make sure we’re attentive to that.’ And that was pretty powerful. Of all the things you could focus on that morning, he thought about the people who were on the road and then our Muslim colleagues.

Otis went on to describe a sometimes trickier part of the leadership task — giving people the room to learn and grow, and ultimately to succeed in your absence. Sometimes this means stepping down not up, being passive rather than active, being silent rather than vocal. These are not the leadership acts we tend to celebrate, but sometimes they’re the most crucial. This balance is Otis’s current focus:

It’s less and less about getting the work done and more and more about…getting the right people in place who have the talent and capability to get the work done and letting them do it… you’ve got to give other people the chance to speak, voice a point of view. Some people are passionate, but it manifests itself in a different way, and so they’re more reflective in conversation. And so, you’ve got to leave some space for them to fill.

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